Mapping London's Diversity and Wealth

"Created by geographer Oliver O’Brien of University College London’s Consumer Data Research Centre, the map also covers the rest of the U.K. and is available in full zoomable form here. Across the country, it shows areas where more than 8 percent of the residents were born abroad. As the street-by-street breakdown makes clear, London has by far the greatest diversity in the country, revealing a city whose demographics continue to evolve and shift.

The map confirms much received knowledge about London’s ethnic geography, and it throws a few curveballs, too. Inner East London, for example, reveals a high Bangladeshi population (...), with which it has been identified for decades. Zoom in, however, and you’ll notice a new group has arrived. The small pockets of yellow represent Americans—the two small patches on the map below are in close proximity to the financial districts of the City of London and Canary Wharf, suggesting that relatively wealthy U.S.-born workers in these areas are altering the local ethnic map.

Elsewhere, Turkish residents (...) are scattered in a constellation of areas up the Lea Valley. As with Bangladeshis in East London, there has been a Turkish community in this area for decades. What is newer, however, is the concentration of Bulgarians (...) and Poles (...) to their west and south, both groups having mostly arrived since their home states joined the European Union.

On the other side of the river, people with a Nigerian background (...) fan out eastwards along the Thames, mainly to its south, while Lithuanian-born residents (...) cluster on the northern bank.

(...) There is nonetheless a connecting thread between all these different neighborhoods: wealth. These are some of the richest parts of the city, places whose multicultural character is sometimes overlooked because, hidden away behind trim hedges and high railings, they fit ill with our preconceptions of what an ethnically diverse neighborhood looks like." (CityLab)

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Image via CityLab

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